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Fine Art River Painting – Contemporary Tonalism

Inspiration abounds in the tall green trees of this fine art river painting!  From the thick foliage of the understory up through the canopy, I look for a variety of greens and yellows in nature.  These colors help to convey a calming mood in this painting. The trees are why I live and paint in the Pacific Northwest!

My greatest influences are the artists of the American Tonalist movement. Their goal was to capture the moods and allure of the landscape.  My work is similar, in that I respond to nature on an emotional level, striving to find the spiritual qualities, or poetry, in the land.

Being outside in nature is an awe inspiring experience.  How does one respond to the beauty of the universe?  Experiencing each moment builds up a series of impressions.  Many impressions create an experience as a whole.  After visiting a scene, I  recall upon the memory of a place.  The memory filters out the most poignant elements and leaves the rest behind.   Designing a good composition for a painting is the key to success.  What I leave out is just as important as what remains. It’s an abstract step in the process, to design a painting, and I may not do an exact rendering of a scene.  As a result, my paintings become more about a feeling, and a sense of place.  How do you feel when you view this painting?

Read more about Tonalism:

If you’re interested in learning more about the American Tonalism Movement please visit: https://www.amazon.com/History-American-Tonalism-Crucible…/dp/0988902222 

The size of River Song is: 45″ x30″.  This contemporary composition is a “stand out” oil painting for any room of your home or office!

If interested in purchasing this fine art river painting please email me at the following email address:

Email : lolly@lollyshera.com

 

Fine art river landscape, fine art river painting, evergreen trees near a river, moody river landscape, river reflections, river song

River Song, 40 x 25

 

Inspiration for the painting, Forest Glow at Treehouse Point, WA

One night at yoga class at Treehouse Point, I watched the sun set behind the tall evergreen trees.  As the sun lowered in the sky the forest began to glow a golden, orange color and I felt the image of this painting come into my mind’s eye.   Painting for me is a personal expression of my connection with Nature. It is about holding on to a fleeting moment in time and making that the main focus or idea of my painting.  Here is the painting, Forest Glow.

Forest Glow, 40×24, SOLD

 

Plein Air Washington Artists’ “Little Gems” Juried Show

juried show, landscape painting, oil painting, representational art, plein air painting, realism, classical realism, tonalism

Rhythms of Nature, Solo Exhibition, Burien Arts Gallery, Nov 4-30, 2016

This Friday, November 4th, 5:30pm-8:30pm, is the Opening Celebration for my Solo show, “Rhythms of Nature,” at Burien Arts Gallery.  The gallery is located in downtown Burien.

826 SW 152nd Street
Burien, WA 98166
206.244.7808

As a contemporary landscape painter, my work is a sensitive interpretation of mood, color, and light.  Born and raised in the West, I am rooted in the diverse ecosystems found in western America. There is a sense of stability and order that I feel with the land, and when a location arouses my curiosity and inspires me,  I will create a series of the scene, changing the key, the composition and color harmony. I look for new ways to express spatial relationships and distance with layers of paint, brushwork, gradations, and diffusions of light.

But my paintings are more than that to me.   As a naturalist and outdoors woman since childhood, I have always felt a spiritual connection with trees and fields, and meadows and mountains.  Quiet places speak to me, as well as, long, stretching views with diminishing values and great big skies.   These places make my heart soar to new heights and inspire me, in a lifelong effort, to explore and communicate an honest translation of both soul and the land.

Join me at Burien Arts Gallery if you can!

 

representational art, fine art, impressionist art, classical realism, tonalist landscape, landscape painting, classical painting, barrels, high desert, art

Backyard Barrels, 11 x 14

landscape painting, tonalist painting, representational art, contemporary art, contemporary landscape, classical realism, oil painting, plain air painting, nocturne, deschutes cabin, full moon, mountains, sage brush, trees

Late Night Fishing, 9 x 12

classical realism, contemporary landscape painting, landscape painting, realist art, realism, impressionist art, representational art, nisqually basin, pacific northwest art, fine art

Nisqually Barn, 8 x 10

Deschutes River, oil landscape painting, dead tree snag

Eagle Creek Deadfall, 8 x 10

 

Snoqualmie River Arts Tour – October 15 & 16, 2016

Please join us this Saturday and Sunday for the Snoqualmie River Arts Tour!  My studio is open and ready for visitors!  My good friend and jewelry artist, Inga Rouches, will be sharing the studio with me;  I can’t wait to see her latest creations.  Please find below all the information you need to make your way to my studio.    Hope to see you soon! – Lolly

RiverArtsTour Color Poster 2016 Final

SRAT2016FlyerPage1 Finalfor Web SRAT2016FlyerPage2 Final for Web

 

Instagram (@lollyshera) and Other News

I have been remiss in regular blog posting and many of you now follow me on Instagram, where I post several times per week.  It has come to my realization that longer blog posts take so much time and I have mostly appeared on IG (@lollyshera) as a way of keeping up.

Since I last wrote I have some wonderful news about exhibiting in the Seattle area.  The Puget Sound Group of Northwest Artists is sponsoring an exhibition in the Rainier Club starting in early October.  I am honored to have my piece, Rattlesnake Cove, chosen as part of this show.  This painting was inspired by the early morning light shining down through the cottonwoods in a small cove at Rattlesnake Lake.  Located up in the foothills of the Cascade mountains outside of Seattle, this lake is a popular destination for swimming, fishing, hiking, and kayaking all year around.  I love the mountain scenery there and I have done several paintings of this area. The paintings in this show will hang from early October throughout the holiday season.  Stop by if you get a chance – there are some wonderful artists exhibiting!

landscape of trees and water, reflection, lake, indirect method

Rattlesnake Cove, 19.5 x 12

In other news, I am pleased to announce that my gallery, Reinert Fine Art in Charleston, S.C. is opening a new location in the small mountain village of Blowing Rock, N. C.  Located deep in the Blue Ridge mountains, Blowing Rock is a perfect getaway spot and is sometimes referred to as the “Aspen” of the east!  As a huge skier and mountain enthusiast I love the idea of someday visiting and skiing in Blowing Rock, NC!

Many of my paintings are now be shipped to either Charleston or Blowing Rock.  If you are interested in a particular painting please contact my by email and I will direct you either to the gallery, reinertfineart.com or to my home studio gallery at Lolly Shera Fine Art; my home studio email is lollyshera@gmail.com.

And finally, those of you who have been following me know that I am preparing for a SOLO show at the Clymer Museum in March/April of 2016.  The opening is Friday, March 4th, 2016 at the Clymer Museum & Gallery in Ellensburg, WA.  Their website is clymermuseum.org.  I am sharing my process of some of the paintings for this show on IG (@lollyshera).

Find me and converse with me on FB (lollysherafineart), IG (@lollyshera) and Twitter (@lollyshera)!

Rattlesnake Cove – Indirect Painting Techniques

Here is the finished painting of Rattlesnake Cove!   The process for completing this painting went like this:  I started with a vine charcoal drawing, using a golden section grid to “scale up”  (enlarge)  my graphite study onto the larger panel.    Next, I completed an underpainting, using a mixture of burnt sienna and ultramarine blue.  Then, when this was completely dry, I began the slow process of adding thin layers of opaque and transparent paint, waiting between sessions for the surface to dry.  My medium for this piece was a mixture of refined linseed oil plus sun-thickened linseed oil plus turp.  As the painting progressed I thickened the medium mixture (or reduced the quantity of turp) to stay true to the fat over lean principle.  It was a challenge to create the illusion of sunlight breaking through the tall trees and illuminating the willow bush in the water below.  I will never forget that image when I first saw it last summer at Rattlesnake Lake near North Bend, WA.  You can read about earlier phases of this painting on this blog in a post called “Color Sketch of Rattlesnake Cove.”

 

landscape of trees and water, reflection, lake, indirect method

Rattlesnake Cove, 19.5 x 12

Renaissance Techniques Create a Mountain Scene

The fog rolls in on a misty morning walk around Mt. Si, in the Snoqualmie Valley, WA.     Last blog post I showed you the underpainting for this painting done with one color, Shale, from Vasari.  It’s purplish umber color is neutral enough that it can go either warm or cool.  For this painting I chose a cool color harmony.

Let me describe the steps to create this painting.  To start out,  I glazed in a very light blue layer for the mountains and let it dry.  Then, I laid in an opaque layer  for the sky, using white and naples yellow, with a touch of transparent orange.   Next,  I painted the trees with transparent paints, glazing layer over dry layer.  After that, I adjusted colors and temperatures with velaturas and scumbles.  The last step was brushing the sky color over the tops of the trees, shrouding them in fog.

The many layers of transparent and translucent paint help to create a luminous quality that I like.  As the light passes through the transparent layers it hits the white canvas panel and refracts back out.  The refraction creates a “vibration” between the colors.

This technique of laying down many layers of transparent and translucent paint is not a new technique.  During the 14th century many artists used the techniques of Master artist, Titian, known to apply as many as 30 or more layers of paint.

( Yet Unnamed ), 12″ x12″, oil on linen