From the BlogSubscribe Now

Rhythms of Nature, Solo Exhibition, Burien Arts Gallery, Nov 4-30, 2016

This Friday, November 4th, 5:30pm-8:30pm, is the Opening Celebration for my Solo show, “Rhythms of Nature,” at Burien Arts Gallery.  The gallery is located in downtown Burien.

826 SW 152nd Street
Burien, WA 98166
206.244.7808

As a contemporary landscape painter, my work is a sensitive interpretation of mood, color, and light.  Born and raised in the West, I am rooted in the diverse ecosystems found in western America. There is a sense of stability and order that I feel with the land, and when a location arouses my curiosity and inspires me,  I will create a series of the scene, changing the key, the composition and color harmony. I look for new ways to express spatial relationships and distance with layers of paint, brushwork, gradations, and diffusions of light.

But my paintings are more than that to me.   As a naturalist and outdoors woman since childhood, I have always felt a spiritual connection with trees and fields, and meadows and mountains.  Quiet places speak to me, as well as, long, stretching views with diminishing values and great big skies.   These places make my heart soar to new heights and inspire me, in a lifelong effort, to explore and communicate an honest translation of both soul and the land.

Join me at Burien Arts Gallery if you can!

 

representational art, fine art, impressionist art, classical realism, tonalist landscape, landscape painting, classical painting, barrels, high desert, art

Backyard Barrels, 11 x 14

landscape painting, tonalist painting, representational art, contemporary art, contemporary landscape, classical realism, oil painting, plain air painting, nocturne, deschutes cabin, full moon, mountains, sage brush, trees

Late Night Fishing, 9 x 12

classical realism, contemporary landscape painting, landscape painting, realist art, realism, impressionist art, representational art, nisqually basin, pacific northwest art, fine art

Nisqually Barn, 8 x 10

Deschutes River, oil landscape painting, dead tree snag

Eagle Creek Deadfall, 8 x 10

 

Telluride Morning

I jumped on the chance to visit Telluride, CO, last summer for a landscape workshop with Deborah Paris.  We drew every day, all day, from sunrise to sunset, breathing in the trees, mountains and very thin air.  One morning I met up with a couple of art buddies to draw the sunrise in the Telluride Valley.  It was interesting to observe how the sage brush and desert loving plants grow just above and right down to the edge of the fertile, green ponds and streams in the valley floor.  This painting, Telluride Morning, is about that edge where the dry meets the wet.

Telluride Valley, charcoal drawing, sage brush, valley floor

Telluride Valley Field Drawing, 8 x 10

Telluride, Valley, sage brush, pond, aspen trees, reflection

Telluride Morning Drawing, 8 x 10

Telluride, CO, valley floor, sage brush, aspen trees, reflection, pond

Telluride Morning, 16 x 23

Rattlesnake Cove – Indirect Painting Techniques

Here is the finished painting of Rattlesnake Cove!   The process for completing this painting went like this:  I started with a vine charcoal drawing, using a golden section grid to “scale up”  (enlarge)  my graphite study onto the larger panel.    Next, I completed an underpainting, using a mixture of burnt sienna and ultramarine blue.  Then, when this was completely dry, I began the slow process of adding thin layers of opaque and transparent paint, waiting between sessions for the surface to dry.  My medium for this piece was a mixture of refined linseed oil plus sun-thickened linseed oil plus turp.  As the painting progressed I thickened the medium mixture (or reduced the quantity of turp) to stay true to the fat over lean principle.  It was a challenge to create the illusion of sunlight breaking through the tall trees and illuminating the willow bush in the water below.  I will never forget that image when I first saw it last summer at Rattlesnake Lake near North Bend, WA.  You can read about earlier phases of this painting on this blog in a post called “Color Sketch of Rattlesnake Cove.”

 

landscape of trees and water, reflection, lake, indirect method

Rattlesnake Cove, 19.5 x 12

Color Sketch for Rattlesnake Cove

I made a drawing of this willow bush against the dark trees a couple of weeks ago.  The water was still and dark showing little reflection of the big trees in the background.  When I returned to the site this week to capture the scene in a plein air color sketch the lake had dropped by several feet (Rattlesnake Lake is controlled by a dam by the City of Seattle).   All the water in front of the willow had disappeared and I was looking at brown lake bottom instead of the beautiful yellow reflections.  What to do?  Well, I decided I liked the memory of the scene from before so I stayed put and painted, making up the reflection from memory!  How convenient is that?  Once again, my paintings are about a confluence of time, place and concept.

Here is the color sketch.  I worked for two mornings during the same time for about two hours each day to complete the painting.  I started with a burnt umber wipeout and painted on top of that.  I like how the warmth of the darkish reddish shows through and gives it an overall color harmony.  This sketch is about 7″x12″.  The larger studio painting will be a golden section size of 12″x19.42 inches.

This is an iphone photo so please excuse the glare.  I’ll be getting professional photos taken soon.