From the BlogSubscribe Now

Fine Art River Painting – Contemporary Tonalism

Inspiration abounds in the tall green trees of this fine art river painting!  From the thick foliage of the understory up through the canopy, I look for a variety of greens and yellows in nature.  These colors help to convey a calming mood in this painting. The trees are why I live and paint in the Pacific Northwest!

My greatest influences are the artists of the American Tonalist movement. Their goal was to capture the moods and allure of the landscape.  My work is similar, in that I respond to nature on an emotional level, striving to find the spiritual qualities, or poetry, in the land.

Being outside in nature is an awe inspiring experience.  How does one respond to the beauty of the universe?  Experiencing each moment builds up a series of impressions.  Many impressions create an experience as a whole.  After visiting a scene, I  recall upon the memory of a place.  The memory filters out the most poignant elements and leaves the rest behind.   Designing a good composition for a painting is the key to success.  What I leave out is just as important as what remains. It’s an abstract step in the process, to design a painting, and I may not do an exact rendering of a scene.  As a result, my paintings become more about a feeling, and a sense of place.  How do you feel when you view this painting?

Read more about Tonalism:

If you’re interested in learning more about the American Tonalism Movement please visit: https://www.amazon.com/History-American-Tonalism-Crucible…/dp/0988902222 

The size of River Song is: 45″ x30″.  This contemporary composition is a “stand out” oil painting for any room of your home or office!

If interested in purchasing this fine art river painting please email me at the following email address:

Email : lolly@lollyshera.com

 

Fine art river landscape, fine art river painting, evergreen trees near a river, moody river landscape, river reflections, river song

River Song, 40 x 25

 

Instagram (@lollyshera) and Other News

I have been remiss in regular blog posting and many of you now follow me on Instagram, where I post several times per week.  It has come to my realization that longer blog posts take so much time and I have mostly appeared on IG (@lollyshera) as a way of keeping up.

Since I last wrote I have some wonderful news about exhibiting in the Seattle area.  The Puget Sound Group of Northwest Artists is sponsoring an exhibition in the Rainier Club starting in early October.  I am honored to have my piece, Rattlesnake Cove, chosen as part of this show.  This painting was inspired by the early morning light shining down through the cottonwoods in a small cove at Rattlesnake Lake.  Located up in the foothills of the Cascade mountains outside of Seattle, this lake is a popular destination for swimming, fishing, hiking, and kayaking all year around.  I love the mountain scenery there and I have done several paintings of this area. The paintings in this show will hang from early October throughout the holiday season.  Stop by if you get a chance – there are some wonderful artists exhibiting!

landscape of trees and water, reflection, lake, indirect method

Rattlesnake Cove, 19.5 x 12

In other news, I am pleased to announce that my gallery, Reinert Fine Art in Charleston, S.C. is opening a new location in the small mountain village of Blowing Rock, N. C.  Located deep in the Blue Ridge mountains, Blowing Rock is a perfect getaway spot and is sometimes referred to as the “Aspen” of the east!  As a huge skier and mountain enthusiast I love the idea of someday visiting and skiing in Blowing Rock, NC!

Many of my paintings are now be shipped to either Charleston or Blowing Rock.  If you are interested in a particular painting please contact my by email and I will direct you either to the gallery, reinertfineart.com or to my home studio gallery at Lolly Shera Fine Art; my home studio email is lollyshera@gmail.com.

And finally, those of you who have been following me know that I am preparing for a SOLO show at the Clymer Museum in March/April of 2016.  The opening is Friday, March 4th, 2016 at the Clymer Museum & Gallery in Ellensburg, WA.  Their website is clymermuseum.org.  I am sharing my process of some of the paintings for this show on IG (@lollyshera).

Find me and converse with me on FB (lollysherafineart), IG (@lollyshera) and Twitter (@lollyshera)!

Indirect Painting Technique

Here are four paintings recently completed using an indirect approach.  Starting with a monochromatic under painting gives me a visual of the final picture before  I  start adding color.  The first opaque passage is followed by several rounds of thin glazes, scumbles, and velaturas.  After adjusting  the values,  colors temperature and chroma, I adjust edges and add the final details to bring the picture to completion.  It’s a slow process of working for a short period on one piece before setting it aside to work on another.   I like how the painting develops slowly, over time;  it is similar to how a memory is recalled in your mind-  you see it and feel it emerge from the inside out.

fir trees, distant mountains, yellow clouds, early evening sunset

Rattlesnake Ridge, 9 x 9

 

winter field, gray sky, creek, distant fir trees, purple mountains

Patterson Creek, 8 x 12

 

Dawn, fir trees with dead snag, orange sunrise sky, dark foreground grasses

Morning Majesty, 9 x 12

 

Evening at the Slough, 8 x 10

Evening at the Slough, 8 x 10

 

Rattlesnake Cove – Indirect Painting Techniques

Here is the finished painting of Rattlesnake Cove!   The process for completing this painting went like this:  I started with a vine charcoal drawing, using a golden section grid to “scale up”  (enlarge)  my graphite study onto the larger panel.    Next, I completed an underpainting, using a mixture of burnt sienna and ultramarine blue.  Then, when this was completely dry, I began the slow process of adding thin layers of opaque and transparent paint, waiting between sessions for the surface to dry.  My medium for this piece was a mixture of refined linseed oil plus sun-thickened linseed oil plus turp.  As the painting progressed I thickened the medium mixture (or reduced the quantity of turp) to stay true to the fat over lean principle.  It was a challenge to create the illusion of sunlight breaking through the tall trees and illuminating the willow bush in the water below.  I will never forget that image when I first saw it last summer at Rattlesnake Lake near North Bend, WA.  You can read about earlier phases of this painting on this blog in a post called “Color Sketch of Rattlesnake Cove.”

 

landscape of trees and water, reflection, lake, indirect method

Rattlesnake Cove, 19.5 x 12

Renaissance Techniques Create a Mountain Scene

The fog rolls in on a misty morning walk around Mt. Si, in the Snoqualmie Valley, WA.     Last blog post I showed you the underpainting for this painting done with one color, Shale, from Vasari.  It’s purplish umber color is neutral enough that it can go either warm or cool.  For this painting I chose a cool color harmony.

Let me describe the steps to create this painting.  To start out,  I glazed in a very light blue layer for the mountains and let it dry.  Then, I laid in an opaque layer  for the sky, using white and naples yellow, with a touch of transparent orange.   Next,  I painted the trees with transparent paints, glazing layer over dry layer.  After that, I adjusted colors and temperatures with velaturas and scumbles.  The last step was brushing the sky color over the tops of the trees, shrouding them in fog.

The many layers of transparent and translucent paint help to create a luminous quality that I like.  As the light passes through the transparent layers it hits the white canvas panel and refracts back out.  The refraction creates a “vibration” between the colors.

This technique of laying down many layers of transparent and translucent paint is not a new technique.  During the 14th century many artists used the techniques of Master artist, Titian, known to apply as many as 30 or more layers of paint.

( Yet Unnamed ), 12″ x12″, oil on linen